Universal Brotherhood

Universal Brotherhood

            The Human Race is One Family, Undivided ...

Religion of Responsibility

Religion of Responsibility

The Actions of One Effect Each And All ...

Philosophy of Perfectibility

Philosophy of Perfectibility

Boundless Potential of the Human Spirit ...

Science of Spirituality

Science of Spirituality

Testing and Verifying the Frontiers of Consciousness ...

Karma

Karma

As We Sow, So Shall We Reap ...

Reincarnation

Reincarnation

Living and Learning from Life to Life ...

Sanctity of Nature

Sanctity of Nature

Divinity in Every Atom ...

"If action should not injure others, one's means of livelihood should not exploit anyone, and one's work in this world should contribute, however modestly, to universal well-being and welfare." — The Aquarian Almanac"

Weekly Almanac: Quotes of the Day

He Knows No Change

          He knows no change who knows the true, And on it keeps his eye, Who always still the unseen doth view; Only the false and the apparent die.   Things change, but change not far From what they are not but to what they are, Or rather 'tis our ignorance that dies; Forever lives the knowledge of the wise. — Henry David Thoreau more ...

Culture of Concentration

Culture of Concentration Theosophy, December, 1921 Republished in Universal Theosophy Concentration, or the use of the attention in the direction of anything that we wish to do, consistently and persistently, has long been recognized as the most effective means of arriving at the full expression of our powers and energies. The ancients called the power to focus the attention upon a subject or object for as long a time as is required, to the exclusion of every other thought and feeling, "one-pointedness." Concentration is difficult to obtain among us as a people, because the key-note of our civilization is, in fact, distraction rather than concentration. Constantly and in every direction we are having presented to our minds objects and subjects—one thing after another to take our attention and then to pull it off from what we are putting it on. So, our minds have acquired the tendency to jump from one thing to another; to fly to a pleasa more ...

A Concise Exposition of Chaldaic Dogma

A Concise Exposition of Chaldaic Dogma by Psellus, with additional explanation by Thomas Taylor, extracted from “Collection of the Chaldean Oracles,” Classical Journal, December, 1817; March, June, 1818 “They assert that there are seven corporeal worlds, one Empyrean and the first; after this, three etherial, and then three material worlds,1 the last of which is said to be terrestrial, and the hater of life: and this is the sublunary place, containing likewise in itself matter, which they call a profundity. They are of opinion, that there is one principle of things; and this they celebrate as the one, and the good.2 After this, they venerate a certain paternal profundity,3 consisting of three triads; but each triad contains, father, power, and intellect. After this is the intelligible Iynx,4 then the Synoches, of which one is empyrean, the other etherial, and the third material. The Teletarchæ follow the Synoches. After these succeed th more ...

The Chaldean Oracles

The Chaldean Oracles Rearranged, with English text only. Translation by Thomas Taylor   Here the Chaldean Oracles—compiled and translated by Thomas Taylor—have been arranged with the hope of demonstrating the essence of the Chaldean system, both theoretic and practical. We begin with an invocation, then outline the objective or goal prescribed by the Chaldeans. From here the arrangement is generally given from universals to particulars, based on the outline provided in Psellus’s “Concise Exposition of Chaldaic Dogma,” which Taylor followed closely in his own arrangement. Following these oracles, which directly relate to the procession from the One Principle (or Fire), we have arranged those that deal directly with the returning direction—the ascent of the soul. We close with a collection of remaining miscellanious oracles, including Taylor’s “oracles of uncertain or imperfect meaning.” Portions of some of Taylor’s notes have been i more ...

The Best Food for Man

The Best Food for Man Theosophist, April, 1884 The use of flesh-meat is forbidden on the ground that it is animal food and the reasons against its use are manifold. Some of these reasons are given by Mrs. A. Kingsford, M.D., F.T.S., 1 and are intended most likely for the guidance of the general public—Fellows of the Society not being excepted. The prohibition is wholesale. It does not refer to the flesh of the diseased animals alone, but is general and extends to all flesh, whether of diseased or healthy quadrupeds or of birds. This being so, I do not see what sense the learned authoress intends to convey when she, at p. 108, column 2, para. 3, says:—"A vegetable dictary, to which we may add cheese, milk, butter and eggs, costs three tunes less than a mixed dietary of flesh and vegetables." This sentence, when divested of its financial aspect, signifies in plain phraseology that we are justified in using vegetables, plus cheese, milk, b more ...

Ekāgratā

Ekāgratā (एकाग्रता) ekāgratā, [-tā] f. phil. Perfect mental concentration needed for fixing the mind [dharana] in yoga.—Heritage Dictionary of Sanskrit (Dictionnaire Héritage du Sanscrit) (translated from the French) Ekagrata, one-pointed; the perfect concentration of contemplation. (eka, one; agrata, pointed.)—Working Glossary (WQJ)   Ekagrata or Ekagratva (Occult Glossary) Ekagrata or Ekagratva (Encyclopedic Theosophical Glossary) Ekagrata (Wikipedia) Ekagrata (Wiktionary [incl. etymology]) See the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali, 3:12   more ...

Mandala

“Symbols of divine truth were not invented for the amusement of the ignorant; they are the alpha and omega of philosophic thought.”—H.P.B. Mandala मण्डल maṇḍala: circle, disc | ritual diagram | lit. one of the 10 divisions of the Rig Veda, grouped into hymns.—Sanskrit Heritage Dictionary Mandala (Sk.). A circle; also the ten divisions of the Vedas.—Theosophical Glossary Mandala (Sanskrit) Maṇḍala A circle, ball, wheel, ring, or circumference, as the orbit of a heavenly body, and hence a great circle in astronomy, an orb. Also one of the ten mandalas (circles, divisions) of the Rig-Veda Samhita. Also the sacred circular pictures in Buddhist art.—Encyclopedic Theosophical Glossary See also: Mandala, Hermes Magazine Symbolism of the Mandala, Buddhist Art & Architecture Mandala (wikipedia) https://youtu.be/GA3su0ECdPc more ...

The Eye of the Bird

One bright, sunny morning, a large group of young boys gathered by the woodland with their bows and arrows. But these were not just ordinary boys. These were the five Pandavas and hundred Kauravas! The five Pandava brothers and hundred Kaurava brothers were cousins, and a fierce rivalry between them began when they were only children. These young princes would eventually grow into men of incredible power. The five Pandavas were even sons of gods!  On this day Drona, their mentor and military expert, organized a competition to test their concentration. Across a stream, Drona set up a small wooden bird in a tree. Upon returning to the boys he told them, “Hello children. Today I want to see who among you can strike the eye of that wooden bird across the river.” The bird appeared tiny from where they were standing, but the boys were confident that they could pass their teacher’s test. Had they not already felled great beasts on their hunts more ...

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