Universal Brotherhood

Universal Brotherhood

            The Human Race is One Family, Undivided ...

Religion of Responsibility

Religion of Responsibility

The Actions of One Effect Each And All ...

Philosophy of Perfectibility

Philosophy of Perfectibility

Boundless Potential of the Human Spirit ...

Science of Spirituality

Science of Spirituality

Testing and Verifying the Frontiers of Consciousness ...

Karma

Karma

As We Sow, So Shall We Reap ...

Reincarnation

Reincarnation

Living and Learning from Life to Life ...

Sanctity of Nature

Sanctity of Nature

Divinity in Every Atom ...

"In its series of enclosures of sacred spaces, the symmetry of the mandala has the power to achieve order through diversity and bring about a reunion with the unchanging non-spatial centre of being."

Weekly Almanac: Quotes of the Day

Marriage of True Minds

Let me not to the marriage of true minds Admit impediments. Love is not love Which alters when it alteration finds, Or bends with the remover to remove; Oh no! it is an ever-fixed mark That looks on tempests and is never shaken. It is the star to every wandering bark, Whose worth's unknown, although his height be taken. Love's not Time's fool though rosy lips and cheeks Within his bending sickle's compass come; Love alters not with his brief hours and weeks, But bears it out even to the edge of doom. If this be error, and upon me proved. I never writ, nor no man every loved.   — William Shakespeare more ...

The Moral Law of Compensation

The Moral Law of Compensation By an Ex-Asiatic1 Theosophist, October, 1881 “For thou shalt be in league with the stones of the field; and the beasts of the field shall be at peace with thee.”—Job, Chap. V, v. 23, Christian Bible. As a Western Theosophist, I would like to present to my Indian brethren a few thoughts upon what I conceive to be the operation of the Law of Compensation in part, or, to put it more clearly, upon the operation of one branch of this law. It seems undeniable that this law is the most powerful, and the one having the most numerous and complicated ramifications of all the laws with which we have to deal. This it is that makes so difficult for a human spirit, the upward progress after which we all are striving, and it is often forced upon me that it is this law which perpetuates the world, with its delusions, its sadness, its illusions, and that if we could but understand it so as to avoid its operation, the nirvan more ...

A Dissertation on the Eleusinian and Bacchic Mysteries

PDF Version (scanned original) A Dissertation on the Eleusinian and Bacchic Mysteries Εν ταις ΤΕΛΕΤΑΙΣ καθαρσεις ηγουνται και περιρραντηρια και αγνισμοι, α των εν απορρητοις δρωμενων, και της του θειου μετουσιας γυμνασματα εισιν.—Procli MS. Com. in Plat. Alcib. I. By Thomas Taylor Translator of Aristotle, Plato, etc. Second Edition with Alterations, 1816 ADVERTISEMENT As there is nothing more celebrated than the mysteries of the ancients, so there is perhaps nothing which has hitherto been less solidly known. Of the truth of this observation, the liberal reader will, I persuade myself, be fully convinced from an attentive perusal of the following sheets; in which the secret meaning of the Eleusinian and Bacchic Mysteries is unfolded, from authority the most respectable, and from a philosophy of all others the most venerable and august. The authority, indeed, is principally derived from manuscript writings, which are of course in the pos more ...

Iamblichus

Bio Brief: Iamblichus was a great Theurgist, mystic, and writer of the third and fourth centuries, a Neo-Platonist and philosopher, born at Chalcis in Cœle-Syria. Correct biographies of him have never existed because of the hatred of the Christians; but that which has been gathered of his life in isolated fragments from works by impartial pagan and independent writers shows how excellent and holy was his moral character, and how great his learning. He may be called the founder of theurgic magic among the Neo-Platonists and the reviver of the practical mysteries outside of temple or fane. His school was at first distinct from that of Plotinus and Porphyry, who were strongly against ceremonial magic and practical theurgy as dangerous, though later he convinced Porphyry of its. advisability on some occasions, and both master and pupil firmly believed in theurgy and magic, of which the former is principally the highest and most efficient mo more ...

Theurgy

Theurgy Theurgia, or Theurgy (Gr.). A communication with, and means of bringing down to earth, planetary spirits and angels—the “gods of Light”. Knowledge of the inner meaning of their hierarchies, and purity of life alone can lead to the acquisition of the powers necessary for communion with them. To arrive at such an exalted goal the aspirant must be absolutely worthy and unselfish. Theurgist. The first school of practical theurgy (from θεος, god, and εργον work,) in the Christian period, was founded by Iamblichus among certain Alexandrian Platonists. The priests, however, who were attached to the temples of Egypt, Assyria, Babylonia and Greece, and whose business it was to evoke the gods during the celebration of the Mysteries, were known by this name, or its equivalent in other tongues, from the earliest archaic period. Spirits (but not those of the dead, the evocation of which was called Necromancy) were made visible to the eyes of more ...

Mandala

“Symbols of divine truth were not invented for the amusement of the ignorant; they are the alpha and omega of philosophic thought.”—H.P.B. Mandala मण्डल maṇḍala: circle, disc | ritual diagram | lit. one of the 10 divisions of the Rig Veda, grouped into hymns.—Sanskrit Heritage Dictionary Mandala (Sk.). A circle; also the ten divisions of the Vedas.—Theosophical Glossary Mandala (Sanskrit) Maṇḍala A circle, ball, wheel, ring, or circumference, as the orbit of a heavenly body, and hence a great circle in astronomy, an orb. Also one of the ten mandalas (circles, divisions) of the Rig-Veda Samhita. Also the sacred circular pictures in Buddhist art.—Encyclopedic Theosophical Glossary See also: Mandala, Hermes Magazine Symbolism of the Mandala, Buddhist Art & Architecture Mandala (wikipedia) https://youtu.be/GA3su0ECdPc more ...

The Wise Lion

The Wise Lion A rabbit once resting under a banyan tree had a premonition of doom. “What would happen to me if the earth were to break up?” he wondered. Suddenly, there was a ‘thud’ followed by a rumbling sound. “It’s happened,” thought the rabbit, “the earth's breaking up !"He jumped up and ran. “Why are you running?” asked another rabbit who crossed his path. "The earth’s breaking up!” shouted the first rabbit. “You’d better run too.” The second rabbit ran so fast he overtook the first. “The earth’s breaking up, the earth’s breaking up!” he shouted to other rabbits he passed. Soon thousands of rabbits were scampering through the forest. Other animals too got caught up in the panic. The word spread from mouth to mouth, and soon everyone knew: the earth was breaking up. It was not long before the whole Forest was on the move. Reptiles, insects, birds and four-footed animals fled in wild disorder, and their cries of terror filled the air more ...

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