Universal Brotherhood

Universal Brotherhood

  The Human Race is One Family, Undivided ...

Religion of Responsibility

Religion of Responsibility

  The Actions of One Effect Each And All ...

Philosophy of Perfectibility

Philosophy of Perfectibility

  Boundless Potential of the Human Spirit ...

Science of Spirituality

Science of Spirituality

  Testing and Verifying the Frontiers of Consciousness ...

Karma

Karma

  As We Sow, So Shall We Reap ...

Reincarnation

Reincarnation

  Living and Learning from Life to Life ...

Sanctity of Nature

Sanctity of Nature

  Divinity in Every Atom ...

Concord Consecrates

Long shall these walls Be witness to our work, And, that it may endure forever, Concord consecrates them today.   Let us share every burden With the full weight of love, Then we shall worthily receive here True light from the east.   To attain this benefit Begin the work joyfully, And he, too, who has begun already, Let him begin afresh today. If we have completely attuned Our hearts and words To virtue in this placee Oh, then envy is silenced, And the wish that crowns our hope Completely fulfilled.   — Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart more ...

Buddha and Ambapali

In the story of the Buddha's final journey and Paranirvana, recorded beautifully in the Maha-parinibbana Sutta,1 we are confronted with a peculiarly interesting story: the Buddha's meeting with the lady Ambapali.2 The story contains several meaningful hints at an underlying symbolism, which we hope to at least partially reveal here. First the background: The Buddha's life is recorded in several biographies,3 following the chronology of events from his birth up until, and shortly after his enlightenment. Having attained buddhahood under the Bodhi tree, he then spent over 40 years traveling throughout the Gangetic plain of northern India along with his assembly of bikkhus (monks). His travels through this time are recorded in a multitude of suttas in no particular chronolocial order,4 until we come to the beginning of the Maha-parinibbana Sutta, where the thread of the chronology is once again picked up. The story we are to examine occurs more ...

Bhagavad Gita: Chapter 5

Bhagavad-Gita Recension By William Quan Judge Chapter V: Devotion By Means Of Renunciation Of Action ARJUNA: “At one time, O Krishna, thou praisest the renunciation of action, and yet again its right performance. Tell me with certainty which of the two is better.” KRISHNA: “Renunciation of action and devotion through action are both means of final emancipation, but of these two devotion through action is better than renunciation. He is considered to be an ascetic1 who seeks nothing and nothing rejects, being free from the influence of the ‘pairs of opposites,’2 O thou of mighty arms; without trouble he is released from the bonds forged by action. Children only and not the wise speak of renunciation of action3 and of right performance of action4 as being different. He who perfectly practices the one receives the fruits of both, and the place5 which is gained by the renouncer of action is also attained by him who is devoted in action. Tha more ...

The Cause of Sorrow

The Cause of Sorrow Theosophy, August, 1921 We are never free from pain, sorrow, and suffering in the world. Pleasures come and go very lightly, but always the sorrow and suffering of life itself abides with us. If we could see and understand the cause of the sorrow existing in the world in every direction—not only the sorrows of the ordinary life but those brought about by collective action, as wars are—we should cease to make that cause. We have assumed that all these sorrows are due to external causes—to some higher being or beings, or to some outside laws of the universe; never to ourselves. And because we have never brought it home to ourselves that we are in any way connected with the causes of sorrow which come our way, we go on looking for something external to relieve us of those sorrows. Not all the religions that ever have existed on the face of the earth, not all that the sciences have so far achieved or may achieve will eve more ...

Atmanatma-Viveka: Discrimination of Spirit and Not-Spirit

Atmanatma-Viveka “Discrimination of Spirit and Not-Spirit” Translated by Mohini M. Chatterji INTRODUCTORY NOTE An apology is scarcely needed for undertaking a translation of Sankara Acharya’s celebrated Synopsis of Vedantism entitled “Atmanatma Vivekah.” This little treatise, within a small compass, fully sets forth the scope and purpose of the Vedanta philosophy. It has been a matter of no little wonder, considering the authorship of this pamphlet and its own intrinsic merits, that a translation of it has not already been executed by some competent scholar. The present translation, though pretending to no scholarship, is dutifully literal, excepting, however, the omission of a few lines relating to the etymology of the words Sarira and Deha, and one or two other things which, though interesting in themselves, have no direct bearing on the main subject of treatment—TR. TRANSLATION Nothing is Spirit which can be the object of consciousne more ...

Qualifications for Chelaship

Qualifications for Chelaship Theosophist, September, 1884 The power of the Adepts over forces of nature, not generally recognized, has been enlarged upon on various occasions, but no account of them can possibly be satisfactory without bringing into prominence their goodness and their solicitude for the welfare of the race, which an ordinary man can no more comprehend than the Polynesian savage measure the intellectual height of a Newton or a Galileo. Surprise is often expressed that the philanthropy of the Mahatmas does not induce them to abandon their seclusion and work for men, among men. But the reason for such apparently strange conduct on the part of these god-like men is not very far to seek. The productive power of our energies varies in accordance with the plane on which they operate. A bricklayer labouring from sunrise to sunset produces work which, when estimated in money, will be found to be but a small fraction of the money more ...

What is Theosophy?

What is Theosophy? By a Paramahansa1 of the Himalayas Theosophist, August, 1882 1. Theosophy is that branch of human perfection, by which one may establish himself with the eternal cause of invisible nature; to which this physical effect is a visible bubble. 2. Theosophy is that knowledge which leads one from animalism to Divinity. 3. Theosophy is that branch of human philosophy, which theoretically teaches one what he really is beyond mind and personal individuality (Ego). 4. Theosophy is that branch of chemistry, by which one begets IMMORTALITY. 5. Theosophy is that branch of painting (one's self) which Time cannot efface. 6. Theosophy is that branch of husbandry (agriculture) by which one may preserve the seed without rearing the tree. 7. Theosophy is that branch of optics, which magnifies one's view to see beyond physical nature. 8. Theosophy is that branch of human surgery, which separates physical nature from the spiritual. 9. The more ...

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