Universal Brotherhood

Universal Brotherhood

            The Human Race is One Family, Undivided ...

Religion of Responsibility

Religion of Responsibility

The Actions of One Effect Each And All ...

Philosophy of Perfectibility

Philosophy of Perfectibility

Boundless Potential of the Human Spirit ...

Science of Spirituality

Science of Spirituality

Testing and Verifying the Frontiers of Consciousness ...

Karma

Karma

As We Sow, So Shall We Reap ...

Reincarnation

Reincarnation

Living and Learning from Life to Life ...

Sanctity of Nature

Sanctity of Nature

Divinity in Every Atom ...

"Motive has to do with morality in the metaphysical sense, the rate of vibration of one's spiritual volition."

Weekly Almanac: Quotes of the Day

The Thought-Factor in Achievement

          All that a man achieves and all that he fails to achieve is the direct result of his own thoughts. In a justly ordered universe, where loss of equipoise would mean total destruction, individual responsibility must be absolute. A man's weakness and strength, purity and impurity, are his own, and not another man's; they are brought about by himself, and not by another; and they can only be altered by himself, never by another. His condition is also his own, and not another man's. His suffering and his happiness are evolved from within. As he thinks, so he is; as he continues to think, so he remains. —  James Allen more ...

An Astral Prophet

An Astral Prophet Lucifer, June, 1890 Every educated Englishman has heard the name of General Yermoloff, one of the great military heroes of this age; and if at all familiar with the history of the Caucasian wars, he must be acquainted with the exploits of one of the chief conquerors of the land of those impregnable fastnesses where Shamil and his predecessors have defied for years the skill and strategy of the Russian armies. Be it as it may, the strange event herein narrated by the Caucasian hero himself, may interest students of psychology. That which follows is a verbatim translation from V. Potto's Russian work “The War in Caucasus.” In volume II, chapter The period of Yermoloff (pp. 829-30-31 and 832) one reads these lines: Silently and imperceptibly glided away at Moscow the last days allotted to the hero. On April the 19th, 1861, he died in his 85th year, seated in his favorite arm-chair, with one hand on the table, the other on more ...

H. P. Blavatsky

H. P. Blavatsky The Path, February, 1890 We have inserted in this issue a picture of H. P. Blavatsky, who is—whether from the standpoint of her enemies or that of her friends—the most remarkable person of this century. Fifty-eight years ago she was born in Russia, and in the year 1875 caused the starting of the Theosophical Society. Ever since that date she has been the target for abuse and vilification of the vilest sort, and, sad to say for human nature, those who have received benefits from her have not given to her efforts that support which was due. But knowing her intimately, we know that she cares nothing for the abuse or the luke-warmness of theosophists, for, as declared by herself, she is not working for this century but for another yet to come, secure in the truth of Reincarnation and content if she can but sow the seeds that in another age will grow, blossom, and bear good fruit. When she will leave the mortal frame now occu more ...

A Memory of Madame Blavatsky

A Memory of Madame Blavatsky Lucifer, June, 1891 The first and earliest impression I received from Madame Blavatsky was the feeling of the power and largeness of her individuality; as though I were in the presence of one of the primal forces of Nature. I remember that the talk turned upon the great leaders of materialism,—then filling a larger space in the public eye than now—and their dogmatic negative of the soul and of spiritual forces. Madame Blavatsky's attitude in the discussion was not combative, hardly even argumentative; still she left in the mind the conviction of the utter futility of material reasoning, and this not by any subtle logic or controversial skill, but as though a living and immortal spirit by its mere presence at once confuted the negation of spiritual life. This sense of the power of individuality was not what one has felt in the presence of some great personality, who dominates and dwarfs surrounding persons in more ...

Life and Teachings of Pythagoras

Life and Teachings of Pythagoras by F. S. Darrow, Ph. D., A.M. Theosophical Forum, July & August, 1911 I. LIFE “Pythagoras, the pure philosopher deeply versed in the profounder phenomena of nature, the noble inheritor of the ancient lore, whose great aim was to free the soul from the fetters of sense and force it to realize its powers, must live eternally in human memory.”—H. P. Blavatsky This world-famous Greek teacher of “the Heart Doctrine” was born about 580 B.C. on the island of Samos and died about 500 B.C. Before his birth it was prophesied to his father that a son was about to be born to him who would be a great benefactor of mankind. Some even went so far as to declare that Pythagoras was a human incarnation of Hyperborean Apollo. It is related that when a mere youth he left his native city to begin a series of travels to the wise men of all countries, from the Hindus and Arabs in the East, to the Druids of Gaul in the West more ...

Theurgy

Theurgy Theurgia, or Theurgy (Gr.). A communication with, and means of bringing down to earth, planetary spirits and angels—the “gods of Light”. Knowledge of the inner meaning of their hierarchies, and purity of life alone can lead to the acquisition of the powers necessary for communion with them. To arrive at such an exalted goal the aspirant must be absolutely worthy and unselfish. Theurgist. The first school of practical theurgy (from θεος, god, and εργον work,) in the Christian period, was founded by Iamblichus among certain Alexandrian Platonists. The priests, however, who were attached to the temples of Egypt, Assyria, Babylonia and Greece, and whose business it was to evoke the gods during the celebration of the Mysteries, were known by this name, or its equivalent in other tongues, from the earliest archaic period. Spirits (but not those of the dead, the evocation of which was called Necromancy) were made visible to the eyes of more ...

Mandala

“Symbols of divine truth were not invented for the amusement of the ignorant; they are the alpha and omega of philosophic thought.”—H.P.B. Mandala मण्डल maṇḍala: circle, disc | ritual diagram | lit. one of the 10 divisions of the Rig Veda, grouped into hymns.—Sanskrit Heritage Dictionary Mandala (Sk.). A circle; also the ten divisions of the Vedas.—Theosophical Glossary Mandala (Sanskrit) Maṇḍala A circle, ball, wheel, ring, or circumference, as the orbit of a heavenly body, and hence a great circle in astronomy, an orb. Also one of the ten mandalas (circles, divisions) of the Rig-Veda Samhita. Also the sacred circular pictures in Buddhist art.—Encyclopedic Theosophical Glossary See also: Mandala, Hermes Magazine Symbolism of the Mandala, Buddhist Art & Architecture Mandala (wikipedia) https://youtu.be/GA3su0ECdPc more ...

The Wind and the Moon

  Once upon a time, there were two very good friends who lived together in the shade of a rock. Strange as it may seem, one was a lion and one was a tiger. They had met when they were too young to know the difference between lions and tigers. So they did not think their friendship was at all unusual. Besides, it was a peaceful part of the mountains, possibly due to the influence of a gentle forest monk who lived nearby. He was a hermit, one who lives far away from other people. For some unknown reason, one day the two friends got into a silly argument. The tiger said, "Everyone knows the cold comes when the moon wanes from full to new!" The lion said, "Where did you hear such nonsense? Everyone knows the cold comes when the moon waxes from new to full!" The argument got stronger and stronger. Neither could convince the other. They could not reach any conclusion to resolve the growing dispute. They even started calling each other na more ...

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