Universal Brotherhood

Universal Brotherhood

            The Human Race is One Family, Undivided ...

Religion of Responsibility

Religion of Responsibility

The Actions of One Effect Each And All ...

Philosophy of Perfectibility

Philosophy of Perfectibility

Boundless Potential of the Human Spirit ...

Science of Spirituality

Science of Spirituality

Testing and Verifying the Frontiers of Consciousness ...

Karma

Karma

As We Sow, So Shall We Reap ...

Reincarnation

Reincarnation

Living and Learning from Life to Life ...

Sanctity of Nature

Sanctity of Nature

Divinity in Every Atom ...

"The wheel of Life, it is Law, it is Time. It is the foundation of all worlds and the eternal expression of compassion."

Weekly Almanac: Quotes of the Day

Meditation Upon AUM

O Satyakama, AUM is the Supreme Brahman and the conditioned Brahman. By meditating upon It the wise man may attain either the one or the other. If he meditates upon one letter (matra) alone and is enlightened thereby, then after death he will quickly be reborn on this earth. The Rik verses lead him to the world of men, and by practicing austerity, chastity and faith, he will enjoy greatness. If he meditates on the second letter, he will hold the mind and will be led up by the Yajur verses to the intermediate realm, the plane of the moon. Having enjoyed greatness there, he will return again to this earth. But if he meditates upon the Highest Being through the word AUM, consisting of three letters, he will be united with the effulgent sun. He will be freed from sin even as a snake is freed from its skin, and he will be led up by the Sama verses to the realm of Brahma.  From here, the aggregate of all lives, he will behold the Supreme Puru more ...

The Five-Pointed Star

The Five-Pointed Star Theosophist, August, 1881 Of late numerous letters have been received in The THEOSOPHIST office concerning the efficacy of the mysterious Pentagram. Our Eastern readers are perhaps unaware of the great importance given by the Western Kabalists to that sign, and, therefore, it may be found expedient to say a few words about it just now, when it is coming so prominently before the notice of our readers. Like the six-pointed star which is the figure of the macrocosm, the five-pointed star has its own deep symbolic significance, for it represents the microcosm. The former—the “double triangle” composed of two triangles respectively white and black—crossed and interlaced (our Society’s symbol)—known as “Solomon’s Seal” in Europe—and as the “Sign of Vishnu” in India—is made to represent the universal spirit and matter, one white point which symbolizes the former ascending heavenward, and the two points of its black trian more ...

Theosophical Symbols

Theosophical Symbols The Path April 1892 The first article printed in the PATH on this subject was “Theosophical Symbolism” in Vol. I, May, 1886. The symbols of the Society are contained in its seal, which may be described first. It consists of a serpent formed into a circle and biting or swallowing its tail. Placed within this circle are two interlaced triangles that make what is called the “Seal of Solomon,” one of the triangles pointing apex up and the other apex down. That one which points up is white in colour or any shade that is equivalent to that when compared with the other triangle, which is dark,as it should always be so represented. On the serpent and near its head so as to be in the centre line of the circle is a small circle within which is inscribed the Swastica, a simple cross with its four ends turned backward. Inside the central space enclosed by the two interlaced triangles is placed the famous cross of the Egyptians more ...

Ammonius Saccas

  Bio Brief: A great and good philosopher who lived in Alexandria between the second and third centuries of our era, and who was the founder of the Neo-Platonic School of Philaletheians or “lovers of truth”. He was of poor birth and born of Christian parents, but endowed with such prominent, almost divine, goodness as to be called Theodidaktos, the “god-taught”. He honoured that which was good in Christianity, but broke with it and the churches very early, being unable to find in it any superiority over the older religions. For more on Ammonius Saccas, see here. more ...

Atman

Atman Atmâ (or Atman) (Sk.). The Universal Spirit, the divine Monad, the 7th Principle, so-called, in the septenary constitution of man. The Supreme Soul.—Theosophical Glossary (HPB)   Atma, the spirit of the universe; spirit; soul; the animating spiritual breath; the permanent Self; the highest principle of life in the universe; in one sense Brahma, the supreme deity and soul of the universe.—Working Glossary (WQJ)   A’tmá, the spirit ; the divine monad ; the seventh principle of the septenary human constitution.—Glossary from Five Years of Theosophy Atman (Encyclopedic Theosophical Glossary) See also: Atman (Theosopedia) Atman (Theosophy Wiki) more ...

The Boundless Circle

“Symbols of divine truth were not invented for the amusement of the ignorant; they are the alpha and omega of philosophic thought.”—H.P.B. The Boundless Circle "The Circle was with every nation the symbol of the Unknown—“Boundless Space,” the abstract garb of an ever present abstraction—the Incognisable Deity. It represents limitless Time in Eternity." (Secret Doctrine, I:113) "The one circle is divine Unity, from which all proceeds, whither all returns. Its circumference—a forcibly limited symbol, in view of the limitation of the human mind—indicates the abstract, ever incognisable presence, and its plane, the Universal Soul, although the two are one." (Secret Doctrine, I:1) "The One is an unbroken Circle (ring) with no circumference, for it is nowhere and everywhere; the One is the boundless plane of the Circle, manifesting a diameter only during the manvantaric periods..." (Secret Doctrine, I:13)   more ...

The Camel and the Mouse

A small mouse once caught a camel's head-rope in its paws and went off with it. Due to the nimbleness with which the camel set off, the mouse was duped into thinking himself a champion. His obvious pride struck the camel. Presently the mouse came to a great river, such as would have dismayed any lion or wolf. There the mouse halted, not knowing what to do. "Dear friend over mountain and valley," said the camel, "why are you standing still? Into the river with you! You are my guide and leader; do not halt half-way, frozen!" "But this a vast and dangerous river", said the mouse. "I am afraid of being drowned, my friend." "Let me see how deep the water is", said the camel, and quickly he set his foot in it. "Why, the water only comes up to my knee", he went on. "What is the problem?" "To you it is an ant, but to me it is a dragon", said the mouse. "There are great differences between one knee and another. If it only reaches your knee, it p more ...

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