Universal Brotherhood

Universal Brotherhood

The Human Race is One Family, Undivided ...

Religion of Responsibility

Religion of Responsibility

The Actions of One Effect Each And All ...

Philosophy of Perfectibility

Philosophy of Perfectibility

Boundless Potential of the Human Spirit ...

Science of Spirituality

Science of Spirituality

  Testing and Verifying the Frontiers of Consciousness ...

Karma

Karma

As We Sow, So Shall We Reap ...

Reincarnation

Reincarnation

  Living and Learning from Life to Life ...

Sanctity of Nature

Sanctity of Nature

Divinity in Every Atom ...

"It is the Hermetic Method of coming from above below, the method of analogy and correspondence. The Hermetic Method is the archetypal dialectic." — The Aquarian Almanac

Weekly Almanac: Quotes of the Day

Soaring Upwards

                There are two rungs of service That a person can come to know. The first is called Qatnut,   'the lesser service'. In this state you may know That there are many heavens encircling you, That the earth on which you stand is But a tiny point, And that all the world is nothing Before the Endless God — But even knowing all these things, You yourself cannot ascend. This is still the 'lesser service'. It is of this state the prophet says: "From afar God appears to me". But he who serves in Gadlut, 'the greater service', Takes hold of himself with all his strength And his mind soars upward, Breaking through the heavens all at once, Rising higher, Higher than the angels. — Zawa'at Rivash more ...

How can we understand “Being” and “Non-Being”?

The ABSOLUTE; the Parabrahm of the Vedantins or the one Reality, SAT, ... is, as Hegel says, both Absolute Being and Non-Being. (SD 1:16) This Infinite and Eternal Cause—dimly formulated in the "Unconscious" and "Unknowable" of current European philosophy—is the rootless root of "all that was, is, or ever shall be." It is of course devoid of all attributes and is essentially without any relation to manifested, finite Being. It is "Be-ness" rather than Being (in Sanskrit, Sat), and is beyond all thought or speculation. (SD 1:14) In the sense and perceptions of finite "Beings," THAT is Non-"being," in the sense that it is the one BE-NESS ... (SD 1:7) This "Be-ness" is symbolised in the Secret Doctrine under two aspects. On the one hand, absolute abstract Space, representing bare subjectivity, the one thing which no human mind can either exclude from any conception, or conceive of by itself. On the other, absolute Abstract Motion represent more ...

Antiquity of the Vedas

Antiquity of the Vedas Theosophist, October, 1879 A journal interested like the THEOSOPHIST in the explorations of archæology and archaic religions, as well as the study of the occult in nature, has to be doubly prudent and discreet. To bring the two conflicting elements—exact science and metaphysics—into direct contact, might create as great a disturbance as to throw a piece of potassium into a basin of water. The very fact that we are predestined and pledged to prove that some of the wisest of Western scholars have been misled by the dead letter of appearances and that they are unable to discover the hidden spirit in the relics of old, places us under the ban from the start. With those sciolists who are neither broad enough, nor sufficiently modest to allow their decisions to be reviewed, we are necessarily in antagonism. Therefore, it is essential that our position in relation to certain scientific hypotheses, perhaps tentative and o more ...

Contemplation

Contemplation Theosophist, February, 1884 A general misunderstanding of this term seems to prevail. The popular idea appears to be to confine oneself for half an hour—or at the utmost two hours—in a private room, and passively gaze at one's nose, a spot on the wall, or, perhaps, a crystal. This is supposed to be the true form of contemplation enjoined by Raj Yoga. It fails to realize that true occultism requires "physical, mental, moral and spiritual" development to run on parallel lines. Were the narrow conception extended to all these lines, the necessity for the present article would not have been so urgently felt. This paper is specially meant for the benefit of those who seem to have failed to grasp the real meaning of Dhyan, and by their erroneous practices to have brought, and to be bringing, pain and misery upon themselves. A few instances may be mentioned here with advantage, as a warning to our too zealous students. At Bareill more ...

Turn the Other Cheek

Turn the Other Cheek by S.A. “Blessed are the poor in spirit: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven. Blessed are they that mourn: for they shall be comforted. Blessed are the meek: for they shall inherit the earth. Blessed are they which do hunger and thirst after righteousness: for they shall be filled. Blessed are the merciful: for they shall obtain mercy. Blessed are the pure in heart: for they shall see God. Blessed are the peace-makers: for they shall be called the children of God. Blessed are they which are persecuted for righteousness’ sake: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven. Blessed are ye, when men shall revile you, and persecute you, and shall say all manner of evil against you falsely, for my sake . . . . . . Ye have heard that which has been said, An eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth: But I say unto you, That ye resist not evil: but whosoever shall smite thee on they right cheek, turn to him the other also. And if any m more ...

“Step by Step,” Ralph Waldo Emerson

"Step by Step" Selection from Circles, Essays: First Series (1841) Ralph Waldo Emerson The key to every man is his thought. Sturdy and defying though he look, he has a helm which he obeys, which is the idea after which all his facts are classified. He can only be reformed by showing him a new idea which commands his own. The life of man is a self-evolving circle, which, from a ring imperceptibly small, rushes on all sides outwards to new and larger circles, and that without end. The extent to which this generation of circles, wheel without wheel, will go, depends on the force or truth of the individual soul. For it is the inert effort of each thought, having formed itself into a circular wave of circumstance,—as, for instance, an empire, rules of an art, a local usage, a religious rite,—to heap itself on that ridge, and to solidify and hem in the life. But if the soul is quick and strong, it bursts over that boundary on all sides, and e more ...

Is “Time” a Dimension of “Space”

Is “Time” a Dimension of “Space” Theosophical Quarterly, January, 1920 Let us come gradually to this knotty question, using a series of familiar references as stepping-stones. To begin with, readers of The Occult World will remember the Master K. H. saying: “I feel even irritated at having to use these three clumsy words—past, present, and future. Miserable concepts of the objective phases of the subjective whole, they are about as ill-adapted for the purpose as an axe for fine carving.” The commentator on Patanjali, who uses this quotation to illustrate and illumine the thought of the twelfth Sutra of the fourth book, somewhat irreverently surmises that there must be something woefully wrong with words that can so far disturb that high, urbane serenity. The Sutra in question is translated thus: “The difference between that which is past and that which is not yet come, according to their natures, depends on the difference of phase of th more ...

Buddhist Economics (selected quotations)

Buddhist Economics (selected quotations) By E. F. Schumacher Economists themselves, like most specialists, normally suffer from a kind of metaphysical blindness, assuming that theirs is a science of absolute and invariable truths, without any presuppositions. The Buddhist point of view takes the function of work to be at least threefold: to give a man a chance to utilize and develop his faculties; to enable him to overcome his ego-centredness by joining with other people in a common task; and to bring forth the goods and services needed for a becoming existence. It is clear, therefore, that Buddhist economics must be very different from the economics of modern materialism, since the Buddhist sees the essence of civilization not in a multiplication of wants but in the purification of human character. From a Buddhist point of view, this is standing the truth on its head by considering goods as more important than people and consumption as more ...

Bhagavad Gita (W.Q. Judge Rendition)

भगवद्गीता Bhagavad-Gita Recension By William Quan Judge Antecedent Words The Bhagavad-Gita is an episode of the Mahabharata, which is said to have been written by Vyasa. Who this Vyasa is and when he lived is not known. J. Cockburn Thomson, in his translation of the Bhagavad-Gita, says: “The Mahabharata, as all students of Sanskrit well know, is the great epic of India, which, from its popularity and extent, would seem to correspond with the Iliad among the Greeks. The theme of the whole work is a certain war which was carried on between two branches of one tribe, the descendants of Kuru, for the sovereignty of Hastinapura, commonly supposed to be the same as the modern Delhi. The elder branch is called by the general name of the whole tribe, Kurus; the younger goes by the patronymic from Pandu, the father of its five principal leaders. “This war between the Kurus and Pandavas occupies about twenty thousand slokas, or a quarter of the w more ...

The Eye of the Bird

One bright, sunny morning, a large group of young boys gathered by the woodland with their bows and arrows. But these were not just ordinary boys. These were the five Pandavas and hundred Kauravas! The five Pandava brothers and hundred Kaurava brothers were cousins, and a fierce rivalry between them began when they were only children. These young princes would eventually grow into men of incredible power. The five Pandavas were even sons of gods!  On this day Drona, their mentor and military expert, organized a competition to test their concentration. Across a stream, Drona set up a small wooden bird in a tree. Upon returning to the boys he told them, “Hello children. Today I want to see who among you can strike the eye of that wooden bird across the river.” The bird appeared tiny from where they were standing, but the boys were confident that they could pass their teacher’s test. Had they not already felled great beasts on their hunts more ...

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