Universal Brotherhood

Universal Brotherhood

  The Human Race is One Family, Undivided ...

Religion of Responsibility

Religion of Responsibility

  The Actions of One Effect Each And All ...

Philosophy of Perfectibility

Philosophy of Perfectibility

  Boundless Potential of the Human Spirit ...

Science of Spirituality

Science of Spirituality

  Testing and Verifying the Frontiers of Consciousness ...

Karma

Karma

  As We Sow, So Shall We Reap ...

Reincarnation

Reincarnation

  Living and Learning from Life to Life ...

Sanctity of Nature

Sanctity of Nature

  Divinity in Every Atom ...

Magnanimity

Magnanimity and contentment are very near allied; like brothers and sisters, they spring from the same parents but are of several features. Fortitude and Patience are kindred to this incomparable virtue. Moralists distinguish Magnanimity and Modesty by making the one the desire of greater, the other of less and inferior honours.  But in my apprehension there is more in Magnanimity.  It includes all that belongs to a Great Soul; a high and mighty courage, an invincible Patience, an immovable Grandeur which is above the reach of injuries, a contempt of all little and feeble enjoyments, and a certain kind of majesty that is conversant with great things; a high and lofty frame of spirit, allied with the sweetness of Courtesy and Respect; a infinite hope and a vast desire; a Divine, profound, uncontrollable sense of one's own capacity; a generous confidence , and a great inclination to heroical deeds; all these conspire to complete it, with more ...

Letters That Have Helped Me: Letter 3

Letters That Have Helped Me Letter 3 Say, Brother Jasper, are you tired? I am. Not tired of fate or of the great "Leaders of the World," but with all these people who gape and gape and are (excuse me) so Americanly "independent," as if men were ever independent of each other. You ask about the "moment of choice." It is made up of all moments. It is not in space or time, but is the aggregation of those moments flying by us each instant. It is referred to in Esoteric Buddhism as a period not yet arrived for the race, when it will as a whole be compelled to make choice for good or evil. But any single individual can bring on the period for himself. When it will or has come, the uninstructed cannot tell. For the student of occultism it may come in the next instant, or it may come one hundred lives after. But it cannot come this instant unless all the previous lives have led up to it. Yet as regards the student, even if it be presented to hi more ...

The Mouse and the Camel

A small mouse once caught a camel's head-rope in its paws and went off with it. Due to the nimbleness with which the camel set off, the mouse was duped into thinking himself a champion.  His obvious pride struck the camel. Presently the mouse came to a great river, such as would have dismayed any lion or wolf. The mouse halted, not knowing what to do. "Comrade over mountain and plain," said the camel, "why are you standing still? Into the river with you! You are my guide and leader; do not halt half-way, paralyzed!" "But this is a vast and deep river", said the mouse. "I am afraid of being drowned, comrade." "Let me see how deep the water is" said the camel, and quickly set his foot in it." "Why, the water only comes up to my knee", he went on. "What is the problem?" "To you it is an ant, but to me it is a dragon", said the mouse.  "There is a great differences between one knee and another. If it only reaches your knee, it passes a hund more ...

The Vow of Silence

The Vow of Silence Theosophy, April, 1924 Re-Printed in “Living the Life” One, if not the greatest, of evils by which modern society is corrupted, is that of gossip. Injurious speech, or small talk ensouled by the spirit of competition, not only ruins other people's character, but also corrupts our own. This is not recognized. Small talk has become and is studied as an art, and the infamy of gossip has emerged as an institution of social amusement. Its infamous nature is forgotten, its dire effects fail to impart their lesson, and it has assumed for modern men and women the place of a necessity of life. Social avocations in cultured drawing rooms as also in abusive slums pursue the path of small talk and mean gossip. The first requirement of the spiritual life is to learn the value of silence. The conservation of spiritual energy demands that the frittering away of soul-forces be stopped. There are few avenues through which man's divini more ...

Bhagavad Gita: Chapter 6

Bhagavad-Gita Recension By William Quan Judge Chapter VI: Devotion By Means of Self-Restraint KRISHNA: “He who, unattached to the fruit of his actions, performeth such actions as should be done is both a renouncer1 of action and a devotee2 of right action; not he who liveth without kindling the sacrificial fire and without ceremonies.3 Know, O son of Pandu, that what they call Sannyasa or a forsaking of action is the same as Yoga or the practice of devotion. No one without having previously renounced all intentions can be devoted. Action is said to be the means by which the wise man who is desirous of mounting to meditation may reach thereto; so cessation from action is said to be the means for him who hath reached to meditation. When he hath renounced all intentions and is devoid of attachment to action in regard to objects of sense, then he is called one who hath ascended to meditation. He should raise the self by the Self; let him no more ...

Teachers: Gautama Buddha

Gautama the Buddha stands today as one of the greatest sages ever to walk the Earth. He was born in Kapilavastu (modern day Nepal) in 621BCE to a king and queen of the Kshatriya caste. He was raised in the lap of luxury but renounced all fortune, all comfort, and even the throne of the kingdom itself, in order to walk the Gangetic plains, first as a seeker of truth and then as a great teacher. He taught openly the most practical and ethical spiritual code, and instructed his bhikkhus (disciples) in the most profound metaphysics. His life appears to have been utterly blameless, his intentions utterly divine. The teachings that come down to us from this great sage provide the basis for a true brotherhood of humanity and a profound understanding of our place in the grand scheme of spiritual evolution. We have composed an extensive biography of the Buddha, drawn from the traditional biographical sources and supported by a number of key sutt more ...

A French View of Women’s Rights

A French View of Women’s Rights The Pioneer, December 2,1880 With a little book entitled “Les Femmes qui Tuent et les Femmes qui Votent”, Alexandre Dumas, fils, has just entered the arena of social and political reform. The novelist, who began by picking up his Beatrices and Lauras in the social gutter, the author of “La Dame aux Camélias” and “La Dame aux Perles”, is regarded in France as the finest known analyst of the female heart. He now comes out in a new light; as a defender of Women’s Rights in general, and of those women especially whom English people generally talk about as little as possible. If this gifted son of a still more gifted father never sank before to the miry depths of that modern French realistic school now in such vogue, the school headed by the author of l’Assommoir and Nana, and so fittingly nicknamed l’École Ordurialiste, it is because he is a born poet, and follows the paths traced out for him by the Marquis d more ...

Theosophical Study and Work

Theosophical Study and Work Branch Paper No. 8, November, 1890 The birth and life of a Branch of the Theosophical Society are very like to those of an individual. As with persons so with a body of theosophists engaged in theosophical endeavor and study, the parentage and the subsequent environment have much to do with the continuance of life and with the power of the influence exerted over the units which compose the association, as well as that which radiates from the Branch to others outside. And in a Theosophical Society its authorship is divided among all those who come together in order to start and carry it on. If the authors of its being are unintelligent, or confused, or uncertain, or self-seeking in the formation of the Society, its life and work will be the same. Growth will be stopped, influence hindered, and results—nothing. The work and influence of a Branch hinge upon the knowledge of theosophical doctrine, upon the motive more ...

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